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Lisa Gennetian was also recently highlighted as one of Duke’s “Trailblazers,” a select group of Duke faculty and staff that embody the future of Duke during the Centennial year of 2024.

Named after the esteemed Susan Tifft, the Eugene C. Patterson Professor of the Practice of Communications and Journalism, this award celebrates educators who excel in guiding and nurturing undergraduate students.

Students nominated Lisa Gennetian for this award, and the praise for her instruction was glowing. Here are a few of the highlights from the dozens of students who submitted nominations.  

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Lisa Gennetian

"Professor Gennetian is a phenomenal teacher. She does an incredible job at incorporating her own research into her teaching which is inspiring.”

“Professor Gennetian has taken a topic (economics) that seems very daunting to many public policy students and has made it accessible through her teaching.”

“Professor Gennetian is an extremely intelligent, thoughtful professor. She cares deeply about her students and ensures that everyone has the opportunity to engage with economics in a meaningful way, even if it isn't their favorite subject. Her lectures are always applied to the real world in an intentional way, making the class concepts easier to understand and realistic.”

“Professor Gennetian is an excellent professor who cares a lot about her students. Her success in her research is coupled with the effort she invests in her students. She is always available and gives excellent feedback. I love her class!”

Beyond her teaching accomplishments, Gennetian, Professor of Public Policy and the Pritzker Professor of Early Learning Policy Studies was also recently highlighted as one of Duke’s “Trailblazers,” a select group of Duke faculty and staff that embody the future of Duke during the Centennial year of 2024.

Gennetian is an applied economist whose research straddles a variety of areas concerning child poverty, from income security and stability to early care and education, with a particular lens toward identifying causal mechanisms underlying how child poverty shapes children’s development. She is a co-leader on the first multi-site, multi-year randomized control study of a monthly unconditional cash transfer to low-income mothers of infants in the U.S. called Baby’s First Years.