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South and Southeast Asia

The Sanford School of Public Policy’s connection to South and Southeast Asia is strong and growing. For example, after the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, faculty members Elizabeth Frankenberg and Duncan Thomas collaborated with colleagues in Indonesia to develop a longitudinal survey to study the impacts of the tsunami and to track recovery. The project has followed 30,000 survivors, conducting surveys every year for the first five years, and is still working in the region.

Many Sanford students participate in a special summer programs in south and southeast Asia, like one based in India. Faculty members conduct policy research in both urban slums and rural villages. The school also helped design a master’s program in environmental public policy at Vietnam National University.

In addition, we offer custom-designed executive education programs to government officials in developing countries. Typically such training is offered through the Duke Center for International Development (DCID). Students come to study at Duke, and scholars often travel to provide training locally.


It’s estimated that 1.2 billion people around the world live without electricity. Another billion have only limited access to electricity. And billions more lack access to clean fuel and technology for cooking. There’s an exciting new project designed to address the energy needs of the world’s poor. It’s called the Energy Access Project.

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Duke University is launching a project focused on developing new and collaborative ways to meet the energy needs of some of the world’s most disadvantaged communities, President Vincent E. Price announced Wednesday.