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North America

While some of the Sanford School’s study and research takes place in far-flung locations, a great deal of our scholarship is located in North America. Faculty members research some of the most pressing issues of our time related to health, energy, the environment, media and societal concerns such as inequality, education, governance and food policy. They explore such issues in Canada and Mexico as well as in the United States.

We also have robust partnerships within our hometown, the city of Durham, N.C. For example, researchers use data provided by the school system to research vital policy questions including investment in pre-kindergarten programs.

Students have also formed an effective program in which groups of students from diverse disciplines including public policy, business and engineering team up to help a local nonprofit solve a problem. How should a nonprofit keep its volunteer data safe? How can a nonprofit best showcase its success? Each semester dozens of students are working on such practical issues.

Undergraduate Student Nathan Keene
06.26.2017

"The ethics class I took for the Public Policy requirements - we talked a lot about health outcomes and inequalities and Scrap Exchange tackles that. They try to engage low-income neighborhoods and the community around here. Seeing that has helped me to apply the ethics  that I have learned. I have taken [several] philosophy courses and there is a lot that I learned about the importance of community, the rights of a community, how it helps individuals to grow. Scrap Exchange is really big on trying to foster that sense of community, and help try to make itself part of Durham."

Medical Care patient
06.22.2017

DURHAM, N.C. -- The survival rate of U.S. gunshot victims has not shown a marked improvement, as other recent studies have suggested, according to new research from Duke University and the University of California, Davis.

The purported increase in survival rate had been credited to improvements in emergency treatment and medical care of critically injured patients. But on close analysis, researchers found problems in the way data was collected and coded.