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Faculty

Joel B Rosch
Visiting Lecturer in the Sanford School of Public Policy

Education

Ph.D., University of Washington (1971)
B.A., Hobart/William Smith College (1969)

Bio

Joel Rosch is a senior research scholar and policy liaison at the Center for Child and Family Policy and an adjunct professor in the Master of International Development Policy program. His present research interests focus on the structure of service delivery systems and the framing of public dialogue about the effectiveness of public programs.

Rosch earned a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Washington. He has taught courses on law and society and on crime and public policy at various colleges and universities in both the U.S. and Japan. Rosch has published articles and delivered papers on policing, crime prevention, dispute resolution, general prevention policy, courts, corrections, crime trends, the politics of crime and punishment, and Japanese law.

Prior to coming to Duke, Rosch was a lead planner at the North Carolina Governor's Crime Commission, where he administered both the federal Children’s Justice Block Grant targeting child abuse and the Juvenile Accountability Incentive Block Grant, where he worked with local communities to develop programs for court- involved youth. Rosch developed an interest in children’s issues while serving as the director of research and planning for the State Bureau of Investigation, where he represented law enforcement on a number of task forces, including the North Carolina Child Fatality Task Force and the North Carolina Child Death Review Team. These experiences lead to a broader interest in child policy.

Over the last decade, Rosch has been involved in the redesign of North Carolina’s juvenile justice system, the child protective service system, the child death review system, the substance abuse treatment system for adjudicated youth, the development of North Carolina's graduated driver's license system, the development of a substance abuse treatment system for juvenile offenders and the child mental health system. He is regularly called upon to assist agencies working with each of those systems and has helped public health, the courts, the office of juvenile justice and child protective services with grant applications to promote system integration.

Rosch helped found and was the first co-chair of the North Carolina State Collaborative, a coalition of public and private agencies working to establish a system of care for children and families. He also serves on the policy committee for the North Carolina chapter of the United Way.

Selected Grants

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