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02.05.2018

How Do Criminals Get Their Guns? [Podcast]

man holding gun

Duke professor Philip J. Cook has been tracking the underground gun market in America for the last 15 years. For one project, his team went to one of the largest jails in the country and asked the inmates one simple question: where do you get your guns? Also on the podcast, a former Chicago gang member reflects on his life with guns.

01.30.2018

Gerrymandering in North Carolina, Two Perspectives [Podcast]

flag in window

A panel of federal judges recently declared North Carolina's congressional maps unconstitutional. (Congressional maps divide the state into voting districts.) The maps had been drawn by Republicans and tilted heavily in their favor.

01.29.2018

#HumansofDukeSanford Rachel Rubin PPS'19

As somebody with a lot of access to information still am not educated on all of the things that I feel I should be educated on. And so, that's kind of a foundational question of democracy - how, with a sprawling public that has a lot of different issues and people who assign different importance to different issues, how do you get people to a place where everybody has the same facts, everyone is operating with the same types of policy understanding? How do we get to a place where people are having meaningful debate? 

01.26.2018

Books by Sanford Faculty Published in 2018

A new year brings new books! Sanford faculty members have been busy writing and several of their books are either out already or coming soon. Check out some of their works below with more to be added as they are published:

01.26.2018

Policy Questions Around Facebook's Algorithm Changes [Podcast]

algorithm

The algorithms that determine what we see on social media platforms wield a lot of power, especially when it comes to the news that people see. Facebook made big news recently when the company tweaked its algorithm. And did you know some real news stories are not written by humans, but by smart algorithm? In this episode of the Policy 360 podcast, Kelly Brownell discusses the promise and peril of algorithms with Phil Napoli. Napoli was recently awarded a fellowship by the Carnegie Corporation of New York to explore this topic more closely.

01.24.2018

Military Women, Health Care Access, Fake News: Undergraduates’ Policy Research Reflects Interests, Career Plans

Three thesis students

By Adam Beyer

The public policy honors thesis program draws students with a diverse array of passions, all interested in pursuing original research.

01.23.2018

Rev. Barber to Speak at Duke for World Day of Social Justice

William Barber

The Rev. Dr. William J. Barber II, founder of the Forward Together Moral Movement, will speak on “Poverty, Health and Social Justice” Tuesday, Feb. 20, at Duke University’s Page Auditorium.

01.19.2018

Alumna Leads North Carolina Community College System Through Transition

North Carolina has 58 community colleges, serving approximately 700,000 students annually, spread all across the state. Jennifer Haygood MPP’01 is one of the system’s top administrators.

01.11.2018

Judith Kelley Named Dean of the Sanford School

Judith Kelley in classroom

Judith Kelley, an expert on human rights, democracy and international elections, has been named dean of the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University.

01.04.2018

What Works in Prison Reform

prison walls

The N.C. Department of Public Safety recently commissioned a study to determine how the state's prisons could be run more safely. Caitlin Saunders, a recent MPP graduate, and faculty member Joel Rosch wrote the report.

01.04.2018

#HumansofDukeSanford Aateeb Khan PPS’17

"There's a very specific reason why I’m interested in Public Policy and I think a lot of it has to do with my upbringing. I'm an American Muslim born and raised very much in the post-9/11 generation."

12.19.2017

Students Learn to Lean Across the Aisle [Podcast]

animated image of young people

A student-led initiative on college campuses in North Carolina is tackling one of the most important issue of our time – political polarization. "Leaders for Political Dialogue" convenes students from Duke, N.C. State, UNC and N.C. Central. Students spend a weekend learning how to communicate better with those whose political opinions may differ from their own.

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